Chango S Fire Essay Competition

By Peter Bonilla September 6, 2017

As we kick off the new school year, FIRE is delighted to announce the return of our Free Speech Essay Contest! Open to high school juniors and seniors, our essay contest asks students to write about the importance of freedom of speech both to higher education and society at large, using FIRE’s videos and other available materials to guide them. FIRE will award a total of $20,000 in college scholarship funds to the winners of the contest, including a $10,000 first prize.

The return of FIRE’s essay contest could not be more timely, as free speech in higher education has become an increasingly urgent and contentious national issue. It is more important than ever that high school students have an understanding of the importance of free speech before they head to college so that they are prepared to defend themselves against censorship when they arrive.

FIRE will award one $10,000 first prize, one $5,000 second prize, and three $1,000 runner-up prizes for the best essays. Four $500 winners will be chosen from the remaining entrants in a drawing.

This year’s essay contest asks students to explain why free speech is so important to higher education, and why censorship undermines the ideals of liberal education and a free society.

Further information for entrants is available below.  

Who is eligible to enter the essay contest?

The contest is open to juniors and seniors in U.S. high schools (graduating in 2018 or 2019), including home-schooled students, as well as U.S. citizens attending schools overseas. Additional questions regarding eligibility may be emailed to essaycontest@thefire.org.

What is the deadline for entering?

The deadline for submissions is 11:59 P.M. on December 31, 2017. Winners will be announced by January 31, 2018.

What FIRE materials should I use to prepare my essay?

We ask that entrants watch two FIRE videos—about Williams College student Zach Wood’s fight for open discourse and a University of Cincinnati student’s fight to rid his institution of so-called “free speech zones”—to inform their answers to our essay prompt.

What is the essay prompt?

In 800-1,000 words, explain why free speech is so important to higher education, and why censorship undermines the ideals of liberal education and a free society.

Can we use any of FIRE’s other materials in addition to those videos?

Sure! FIRE maintains a wealth of information for students at no cost to them. These include our ever-expanding First Amendment Library, our daily Newsdesk, our active FIRE Student Network, and numerous publications including our comprehensive “Guide to Free Speech on Campus.” Feel free to educate yourself using any of these resources as you prepare your essays.  

What are the scholarship prizes, and how many winners will be selected?

FIRE will award one $10,000 first prize, one $5,000 second prize, and three $1,000 runner-up prizes for the best essays. Four $500 winners will be chosen from the remaining entrants in a drawing.

Where should I send my essay?

Essays must be submitted through the form on the contest page, thefire.org/contest.

I’d like to know more about FIRE’s work defending free speech. Any suggestions?

Absolutely! To start, we encourage all interested students to join the FIRE Student Network to stay connected with FIRE and learn more about the work being done by their fellow students defending free speech at colleges and universities across the country.

Any additional questions regarding the essay contest can be directed to FIRE via email at essaycontest@thefire.org. Good luck in the new school year, and we look forward to reading your essays!

The submission period for proposals is now closed. Thank you to those who submitted to the competition. We will be back in touch regarding round two by 2 April.

The MIT Press and the MIT Media Lab announce a call for essays on the topic of resisting reduction, broadly defined, for the Journal of Design and Science. Essays should be in conversation with Joi Ito’s manifesto, “Resisting Reduction,” and the articles, also on this theme, published in the third issue of JoDS.

In support of open access scholarship and the free exchange of ideas, JoDS will award up to ten authors $10,000 each for chosen essays. Selections will run in JoDS under a Creative Commons license and will be published in an MIT Press volume. Proceeds from the publication of this volume will support open access publishing at MIT.

This is an open competition and everyone is encouraged to submit a proposal.

The submission deadline for essay proposals of no longer than 300 words is 2 March 2018 at 5pm EST. Semi-finalists will be notified on 2 April 2018 and invited to submit essays of 3,000 to 5,000 words. All selections will be made by the JoDS editorial board and winners will be announced on 16 July 2018.


SUBMISSION CRITERIA

  • Proposals should engage with and expand the conversation started by Joi Ito’s manifesto, “Resisting Reduction” and issue 3 of JoDS, which comprises essays on this topic.

  • A proposal of no longer than 300 words that outlines a new perspective relating to resisting reduction.

  • Interdisciplinary essays are encouraged. Proposals can focus on topics in any field of inquiry and are not limited by discipline.

  • Essay proposals must be written in English.

  • Your name, email address, brief bio, and a working title are required.

KEY DATES

2 March 2018: Proposal submission deadline at 5pm EST (<300 words)

2 April 2018: Semi-finalists notified and invited to proceed to the next round

1 June 2018: Essay submission deadline for semi-finalists at 5pm EST (3,000 to 5,000 words)

16 July 2018: Contest winners announced

August 2018: Essays published in JoDS

2019: MIT Press volume published

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